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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
that killed a u.s. ambassador. >> accused nsa leaker edward snowden making new friends and maybe looking for a new home. germany maybe? >> and unearthed a drug tunnel between mexico and the united states that is so sophisticated, it is being called a supertunnel. we're going to take you on a tour. welcome to around the world". i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company today. welcome to our international viewers with us all week. >> first we're going to get to this, benghazi, libya, it was just last ept, four americans were killed in a terrorist attack. one of them the u.s. ambassador. >> today a lot of pressure from republicans in congress to hear directly from cia operatives who were in libya during the attack and also afterwards. so far they have not talked to congress. >> we here at cnn have reported the cia has specifically told those operators to keep quiet. drew griffin is with the cnn investigations unit. drew, first of all, excellent reporting on all of this. they're pushing back right now on what you're reporting. what are they saying? >> being complet
, ever since edward snowden exposed them. calls to rein them in grew louder when it was revealed the u.s. was eavesdropping not only on enemies, but allies. on capitol hill two of america's top intelligence officials made an impassioned defense and here's homeland security correspondent bob orr. >> reporter: the director of national intelligence today confirmed the n.s.a. has long spied on friendly foreign leaders to understanding the thinking of both enemies and allies. >> it's invaluable to us to know where countries are coming from, what their policies are, how that would impact us across a whole range of issues. >> reporter: german chancellor angela merkel has accused the u.s. of monitoring her personal cell phone. senate intelligence committee member, republican susan collins, said today that's inappropriate. >> there's absolutely no justification for our country to be collecting intelligence information on the leaders of some of our closest allies. >> reporter: but before the house intelligence committee, clapper was unapologetic. >> some of this reminds me a lot of classic movie
now. >>> edward snowden's request for clemency getting a thumbs down from the white house. >>> a fireball burning through a montreal neighborhood. >> oh my god that is not cool. >>> passengers at an airport were shocked when a small alligator was found under an escalator. >>> from 55 away, colts go to 6-2. >> seven touchdown passes for nick foles, that equals an nfl record. >> and all that matter. >> toronto's embattled mayor vows to ride the storm out after accusations he was caught on video smoking crack. >> i am not perfect. i have made mistakes. >>> auction day. >> oprah winfrey auctioned off some of her personal belongings over the weekend. >> usually gayle comes by my house on the weekends and says if you don't want that i do. >> announcer: "cbs this morning" brought to you by toyota, let's go places. >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." norah o'donnell is off. margaret brennan is with us. good morning. >> it is so great to be here with you charlie. >>> we begin here the man charged with killing a tsa officer at los angeles international airport, investigators say paul
condition. what investigators have uncovered about a possible motive for that attack. >>> and edward snowden is out with a new manifesto and is asking for clemency from the u.s. why he basically says he did the american government a favor. that's next. i'm a careful investor. when you do what i do, you think about risk. i don't like the ups and downs of the market, but i can't just sit on my cash. i want to be prepared for the long haul. ishares minimum volatility etfs. investments designed for a smoother ride. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. if yand you're talking toevere rheuyour rheumatologistike me, about trying or adding a biologic. this is humira, adalimumab. this is humira working to help relieve my pain. this is humira helping me through the twists and turns. this is humira helping to protect my joints from further dam
.s. surveillance abroad. the material handed over to a reporter by nsa leaker edward snowden and it's providing a seemingly endless stream of revelations. those revelations are rocking america's relationships with some of its closest allies. christiane amanpour is joining us right now. you just spoke to the reporter who has been breaking all of these edward snowden leaks. what did he just tell you? >> reporter: well, first of all, they have thousands and thousands of documents but also, that he just simply rejects what, for instance, mike rogers, chairman of the house intelligence committee, british prime minister david cameron, many, many u.s. and other allied officials are saying, which is that this is dangerous, what they're doing, that they are putting all sorts of people at risk, they are compromising all sorts of abilities to close down terrorist cells and plots and this and that. he rejects that and always has. this is what he said to me on that. >> every terrorist who is capable of tying their own shoes has long known that the u.s. government and the uk government are trying to monitor
for edward snowden says he now has a job in the country where he's seeking asylum. beginning tomorrow, snowden will work for a major russian website where he will be performing maintenance. for security reasons, his attorney isn't naming the employer. snowden is charged with espionage and theft of government property. >>> a secret service report detailing chris brown's alleged assault assault of a man here in washington, d.c. is shedding new light on the possibility defense strategy. the document obtained by cnn suggests that brown's bodyguard could take the rap for the broken nose, while lawyers could question the credibility of one of the police officers investigating the case. brown is currently serving felony probation for his 2009 domestic violence conviction involving the pop star rihanna. a big day here in washington for the new new jersey senator, the former mayor cory booker was sworn in by the vice president joe biden. later met privately with president obama over at the white house. there was a special election this month to serve out the term of the late democratic senator
. >>> edward snowden's request for clemency getting a thumbs down from the white house. >>> a fireball burning through a montreal neighborhood. >> oh my god that is not cool. >>> passengers at an airport were shocked when a small alligator was found under an escalator. >>> from 55 away colts go to 6-2. >> seven touchdown passes for nick foles, that equals an nfl record. >> and all that matter. >> toronto's embattled mayor vows to ride the storm out after accusations he was caught on video smoking crack. >> i am not perfect. i have made mistakes. >>> auction day. >> oprah winfrey auctioned off some of her personal belongings over the weekend. >> usually gayle comes by my house on the weekends and says if you don't want that i do. >> announcer: "cbs this morning" brought to you by toyota, let's go places. >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." norah o'donnell is off. margaret brennan is with us. good morning. >> it is so great to be here with you charlie. >>> we begin here the man charged with killing a tsa officer at los angeles international airport, investigators say paul cian
million calls in spain in one month. documents provided by nsa leaker edward snowden. the spanish government summoned the american ambassador asking for an explanation. >>> this weekend, thousands of protesters marched on capitol hill demanding an end to the government surveillance program at home and abroad. many carried signs praising snowden and thanking him for blowing wistle on the nsa by leaking classified documents. this comes as international outrage builds over the broad scope of the nsa's data gathering over years. european leaders continue to put pressure on the country to for a new spying deal on allies. chefon, thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >> let's explain why it is some officials have explained perhaps why the president would not know about this for five years. >> as it was explained to us, this type of surveillance is the type of program or decision that would be executed at the level of the national security agency and the way the protocols are set up at this point, that's sort of where the line of information would stop. there isn't necessarily a
with edward snowden months ago, they start eed to b very upset in germany, partly because of their history with the secret police, and partly because they thought this president would be different. they thought president obama would do some different in national security than president bush. that's colored their opinion. as former secretary of state madeleine albright has said, everybody does it, i was even bugged by the french when i was u.s. ambassador to the u.n. >> julian, should he have known if the nsa was tapping a personal cell phone of a world leader? >> certainly, the president doesn't know everything going on with the nsa, and we shouldn't expect that. but when you're talking about the surveillance of world leaders and an issue that's been controversial for a while now, you would expect that there's some knowledge, eerlth by the president or people surrounding him. he hasn't said much about the second part of that, but i do think they're surprised that this was off the radar in the inner circles of the white house. >> christiane, you point out spying, one of the world's oldest p
a literal run in with a camera. >> usa today, edward snowden has a new job working for a russian website. it starts earlier this month. they didn't name the company for security reasons. "the washington post," employees of the department of homeland security may have boosted their pay with overtime they didn't earn. with o.t., it's $8.7 million a year. this tactic could add money to a paycheck and used to recruit new workers. >>> san diego union tribune, a police officer issued what many believe is the first ticket for driving while wearing google glass. oh, my god. this woman was caught after being caught for speeding. she plans to fight the ticket. it was blocking her vision and causing a distraction. >>> from "the washington post," the moment air travelers have been waiting for. as long as they don't allow talking on phones. >> what? >> the faa finally agreed to let passengers use electronic devices like tablets and phones throughout flights. >> oh, my gosh. >> reporter: on this halloween travel day with costumes on full display at the airport, there was a treat awaiting travelers. >>
to parts of new england. >> the nsa is denying reports based on documents leaked by edward snowden that it secretly broke into a main connection link that connects yahoo! and google data centers overseas. >>> the boston red sox clinched their first title home at fenway since 1918. congrats to them. >>> straight ahead, some serious questions this morning for those of you with kids who play sports. kids and concussions. a new report sounding the alarm and putting at least some of the blame directly on parents. >>> we have a quick programming note to tell you about. tomorrow and monday on "today" bernard carric speaks out. >> he sits down and talks about his release from prison and president bush's nominee for security. we'll have part one of our interview and he will join us live in our studio coming up on monday morning. >>> let's begin this half hour with a texas police officer hailed as a hero. she was shot twice, once in the face, still managed to pursue the suspects. nbc's janet chandley has more on this. good morning to you. >> reporter: hi, matt, talk about true grit, a 40-yea
surveillance on our own allies. some of the documents posted by or leaked by edward snowden to the media indicate that these programs started in 2002. why spy on an ally? >> jake, if there were such a program, it would be classified and i couldn't talk about it. it would be totally inappropriate, and i haven't been in the loop now obviously for more than four years. so it's just one of those subjects i couldn't discuss. >> without getting specific, on a theoretical basis, what is the interest of the united states in conducting surveillance on a country who is a clear ally of the united states? >> i've got to go with the answer i have given you. let me say this. we do have a fantastic intelligence capability worldwide against all kinds of potential issues and concerns. we are vulnerable, as was shown on 9/11, and you never know what you're going to need when you need it. the fact is, we do collect a lot of intelligence and without speaking about any particular target or group of targets, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, through our conduct of fore
to the united states as a result of the disclosures of the surveilance the nsa surveilance program by edward snowden. let's listen in. >> but the disclosures for better or for worse have lowered the threshold for discussing these matters in public. so to the degree that we can discuss them, we will. but this public discussion should be based on an accurate understanding of the intelligence community who we are, what we do, and how we're overseen. the last few months, the manner in which our activities have been characterized has often been inaccurate or misleading or some combination thereof. i believe most americans realize the intelligence community exists to collect the vital intelligence that helps protect our nation from foreign threats. we focus on uncovering the secret plans and intensions of our adversaries as we've been charged to do. but what we do not do is spy unlawfully on americans or the iz krz of any country. we only spy for valid foreign intelligence purposes as authorized by law with multiple layers of oversight to insure we don't abuse our authorities. unfortunately, this
topping news. a russian news agency says edward snowden will start working a tech support job at a large russian website this month. meanwhile it's also being reported that germany may invite the former nsa contractor to testify into their probe into the nsa spying scandal. >>> a u.s. attorney opened an investigation into the bizarre death of kendrick johnson. he's the georgia teen whose body was found rolled up in a gym mat at his high school earlier this year. federal prosecutors are calling on anyone with information to contact the office of the prosecutor. >>> a north carolina man is in custody this morning after authorities discovered 24 bombs in his barricaded fortress-like home in wilmington. 37-year-old eric rudolph arnb d arnbold -- it's not clear why he was making the bombs. >>> dramatic dash cam video of a high-speed police chase near houston. an officer pursuing two suspects after they shot her twice. after. once in the face. police caught one of the suspects. they're hoping this video will help find the other. >>> and the annual car race from new york to l.a. otherwise know
there are people out there who think that glenn greenwald and edward snowden should be locked up if not hung. there is a lot of passion around this subject. i think that on the whole, greenwald as journalist and snowden as the leaker have forced us to face to have a debate that is long overdue. and to deal with the fact that there is inadequate accountability for the kind of information gathering that goes on in our intelligence community. i think sometimes people like glen greenwald or julian assange bring us brokers of information for one reason or another wouldn't get and they serve a purpose by goting us when we slack and we do. newspapers are put out by human beings and human beings make mistakes. i think, yes, there is uneasy and sometimes contentious but we co-exist and sometim-- >> we'll put a link up on cnn's "reliable sources" website. bill keller, thank you for coming in today and joining us. >> next, my conversation with glenn greenwald on why he thinks bill keller and "the new york times" had formula for journalism exactly backward. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪
that nsa leaker edward snowden could be granted clemency. i want to bring in benjamin carden. senator carden, glad to have you here, sir. >> alex, good to be with you. >> edward snowden released what he called this manifesto for the truth. he says current debates about spying just prove his revelations are helping bring about change. what's your response to that? >> mr. snowden has caused real damage to this country. the manner in which he has conducted these releases have compromised our national security. as senator feinstein said, there's a way in which a whistleblower can get information to us. we want to make sure there's adequate oversight on the powers of the intelligence community. we need the right balance to keep us safe and protect the rights of americans. so there's concern on how we collect data, but for a person who has been given that access and trust on his own to do this type of release is detrimental to our country. >> sir, as you serve on the senate foreign relations committee, i know you're privy to things we are not necessarily. do you believe what we know so far
, but cnn chief national security correspondent jim sciutto has more. the newest edward snowden documents reveal more spying on america's closest allies. in spain, reports the nsa listened in on 60 million phone calls in a single month and in germany the "sontag" newspaper reports president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on angela merkel's calls back in 2010, contradicting white house assurances the president was not aware of the extent of the surveillance. the nsa quickly denied the report telling cnn "general alexander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving chancellor merkel." the nsa's denial a clear step beyond the white house's willingness up to now only to deny present and future monitoring. >> i can tell you the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> reporter: german intelligence officials are expected to come to the u.s.
calls and showed them how the report got it wrong. showed then the slide that edward snowden had released and said this is not true. and by and large talking to the members, they found the explanation satisfying. alexander also told them that when the nsa collects data in europe, they do it in collaboration with european intelligence agency. so i said is it hypocritical for you to be krit sicriticizing th when you're participating. >> we want to get to the truth. there are a set of allegations -- >> by americans and europeans? >> whoever it was, whatever partnerships it may have been, whoever it was, we want to get to the truth of it. >> so in effect they're angry at both sides. they're demanding answers from the u.s. and european governments to find out why mass surveillance is happening and to what extent. >> you're getting statements from yahoo! and google, right? >> that's right. this is in response to the "washington post" story about accessing communications links between their servers. this is from google, we have long been concerned about the possibility of this kind of s
, but the buzz around clinton and christie is undeniably. >> edward snowden says surveillance is a global problem that requires global solutions. >> did you spy on angela america snell. >> i can't comment on any specific activity. >> they have seen my browser stuck on me with no shirt. >> okay. >>> i'm charlie rose with margaret brennan. norah o'donnell is off. police in los angeles say paul ciancia wanted to instill fear in tsa personnel-he faces murder charges in the killing of a tsa officer at los angeles i remember airport. >> security at l.a.x. is under review this morning because of friday's shooting. >> he had a gun, like he had the gun trained down like this and he took two shots. >> didn't make sense to me. i thought, you know, well you know that guy had a gun and no one was there to stop him. you know? police were outside. >> police did respond, shooting inging ciancia four times. sources tell our john mill ter gunman snuck in an assault weapon into the terminal by hiding it in his suitcase and a backpack. he cut holes in the top of the suitcase and the bottom
. edward snowden wrote an open letter published in a german magazine. he calls it manifesto for truth. jim scuitto, what does he include? >> he tries to make the case that he's not a spy, but a whistle-blower on what he calls the global problem of mass surveillance. in this her he calls the u.s. and britain the worst offenders, and condemns them. the debate he says, quote, they wanted to avoid is now taking place in countries around the world, he wrote, instead of causes damage, the use is causing society to push for political reforms, oversight and new laws. >> i spoke to a senior state department official about this, is snowden had a legal means. he could have pursued it in the nsa, taken it up to the inspector general. if that wasn't good enough, he could have gone to court. in fact he's saying he could come back and face the charge in course. that's the legal way to pursue his case. his position, of course, is he won't get a fair trial here. >> the whole issue of u.s./iranian relations. today we saw a huge demonstration marking the 23rd anniversary of the takeover of the -- what does t
nature of the revelation. >> reporter: edward snowden's revelation wills keep coming, says snowden's intermediary glen green wald. >> there's documents in the troef that we have pertaining to virtually every single country in europe, south america, central america, asia, and the middle east, and we intend to report most of that. >> there's a lot more to come. former and current officials say other countries, of course, also spy on us, but clearly not to the extent of the nsa's sweeping data collection. the message from europe, the targeting of friendly foreign leaders has destroyed trust with the u.s., leading some to not believe the u.s.'s claim that the president was unaware of this program until recently. >> andrea mitchell in washington. thank you. >>> we have new developments in the search for four escaped prisoners in oklahoma. two of the men are still at large. nbc's kerry sanders has details on that. good morning to you. >> well, good morning, matt. two of them remain at large, but two others were picked up. the escapees found about 20 miles from here. they're back in the j
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)